Added by on 2013-11-20

It’s easier to make a pie out of apples, and it takes less equipment to juice an orange. Come to think of it that’s pretty close to the comparison at hand, which is that you’d rationally choose Postgres for building complex data models, and MySQL for moving that lowest common denominator over to an open source engine.

Some Differences Between PostgreSQL + MySQL

In general, PostgreSQL makes a strong effort to conform to existing database standards, where MySQL has a mixed background on this. If you’re coming from a background using MySQL or Microsoft Access, some of the changes can seem strange (such as not using double quotes to quote string values).

  • MySQL uses nonstandard ‘#’ to begin a comment line; PostgreSQL doesn’t. Instead, use ‘–‘ (double dash), as this is the ANSI standard, and both databases understand it.
  • MySQL uses ‘ or ” to quote values (i.e. WHERE name = “John”). This is not the ANSI standard for databases. PostgreSQL uses only single quotes for this (i.e. WHERE name = ‘John’). Double quotes are used to quote system identifiers; field names, table names, etc. (i.e. WHERE “last name” = ‘Smith’).
  • MySQL uses ` (accent mark or backtick) to quote system identifiers, which is decidedly non-standard.
  • PostgreSQL is case-sensitive for string comparisons. The field “Smith” is not the same as the field “smith”. This is a big change for many users from MySQL and other small database systems, like Microsoft Access. In PostgreSQL, you can either:
    • Use the correct case in your query. (i.e. WHERE lname=’Smith’)
    • Use a conversion function, like lower() to search. (i.e. WHERE lower(lname)=’smith’)
    • Use a case-insensitive operator, like ILIKE or ~ *
  • Database, table, field and columns names in PostgreSQL are case-independent, unless you created them with double-quotes around their name, in which case they are case-sensitive. In MySQL, table names can be case-sensitive or not, depending on which operating system you are using.
  • PostgreSQL and MySQL seem to differ most in handling of dates, and the names of functions that handle dates.
  • MySQL uses C-language operators for logic (i.e. ‘foo’ || ‘bar’ means ‘foo’ OR ‘bar’, ‘foo’ && ‘bar’ means ‘foo’ and ‘bar’). This might be marginally helpful for C programmers, but violates database standards and rules in a significant way. PostgreSQL, following the standard, uses || for string concatenation (‘foo’ || ‘bar’ = ‘foobar’).
  • There are other differences between the two, such as the names of functions for finding the current user. MySQL has a tool, Crash-Me, which can useful for digging this out. (Ostensibly, Crash-Me is a comparison tool for databases; however, it tends to seriously downplay MySQL’s deficiencies, and isn’t very objective in what it lists: the entire idea of having procedural languages (a very important feature for many users!) is relegated to a single line on the bottom fifth of the document, while the fact that MySQL allows you to use || for logical-or (definitely non-standard), is listed way before this, as a feature. Be careful about its interpretations.)

Category:

Database

Tags:

,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


*